Shah Rukh Khan and His Pakistan Connection

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Shah Rukh Khan when His Parents come to Pakistan and He visited Swat Valley

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An unseen childhood picture of Shah Rukh Khan in Swat (Pakistan) during his visit in 1973

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Shah Rukh Khan with His Cousin Noor Jehan From Peshawar Pakistan

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Shahrukh Khan’s Home in Peshawar , Pakistan

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Shahrukh Khan, Kajol to promote ‘Dilwale’ on Sanam Jung’s show in Pakistan

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Shahrukh Khan family in Pakistan

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Young Shahrukh Khan

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Shah Rukh Khan in School The Colour Green is Painted to Identify Him

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Bollywood actor Shah Rukh Khan giving autograph

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Shah Rukh Khan, Suhana, Gauri and Aryan

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Shah Rukh Khan’s cousins live in Peshawar. His uncle, Gulam Mohammad, was also a freedom fighter much like his father. Mansur Khan, Gulam’s son, makes a living making bamboo ladders. Mansur said that SRK is closest to his younger brother Makshud. Shah Rukh had visited his cousins for the first time in 1978. When Mansur’s sister, Noor visited Mumbai in 1997, she had stayed with SRK for over a month

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Shahrukh Cousin Noorjahan with her husband.

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Shahrukh Family From Peshawar Swnding Him Peshawari S;ippers His Favourite

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Shahrukh Khan family in Pakistan

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Shah Rukh Khan

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Imran Khan’s Click With Bollywood King Shahrukh Khan

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SRK’s parents

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Shah Rukh Khan Baby

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Shah Rukh Khan Baby

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Ali Zafar

The multi-talented star, Ali Zafar has had multiple releases in Indian films and recently worked with Shah Rukh in Alia Bhatt starrer, “Dear Zindagi”

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Javed Sheikh

Veteran Lollywood actor, Javed Sheikh played Shah Rukh Khan’s father in ‘Om Shanti Om’ and we loved Sheikh’s acting in the superhit blockbuster.

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Imran Abbas

The popular drama hero, Imran Abbas had a cameo in, ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’ alongside Fawad Khan, Ranbir Kapoor, Aishwarya Rai Bachan and Shah Rukh Khan.

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Mahira Khan

The Humsafar actress worked with the King of Bollywood for her debut movie across the border, “Raees”. The beauty was loved in India and the chemistry between SRK and Mahira was sizzling!

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Fawad Khan

Pakistan’s Khoobsurat Khan recently starred in the B-town movie, ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’ where the Dilwale actor had a cameo.

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Shah Rukh Khan, along with legendary Pakistan pacer Shoaib Akhter,

Should Computer Science be a mandatory part of a high school curriculum? The answer depends on the time horizon, and also on how one defines “computer science.” The question is moot in the short-term. In the long run, computational thinking and digital literacy will be mandatory, although perhaps integrated in other fields or introduced earlier, before high school.
In the short run: schools would need to offer computer science courses before requiring students study it.
Before answering this question, one must first ask whether schools can actually teach computer science. Today, most high schools don’t teach computer science, they don’t have a computer science teacher, so mandating that every student learn a field that isn’t even offered is silly. Fortunately, schools throughout the U.S. are now taking steps to offer computer science. And 56% of teachers believe computer science should be mandatory for all students [1]. And with Code.orgtraining tens of thousands of new C.S. teachers per year, making computer science mandatory may be possible in less than a decade.
In the long-run: parts of computer science (computational thinking and digital literacy) will be mandatory learning, starting in grades K-8.
Computational thinking – which is the logic, algorithmic thinking, and problem-solving aspects of computer science – provides an analytical backbone that is useful for every single student, in any career. Schools teach math to students regardless of whether they want to become mathematicians, because it is foundational. The same is true of computer science. Consider, at the university level, computer science satisfies graduation requirements for 95% of B.S. degrees [2].
Digital literacy – understanding things like what is the “cloud,” what are “cookies,” or how does “encryption” work – these are useful for every student, regardless of whether they want to become a lawyer, a doctor, or a coder. They are just as foundational as learning about photosynthesis, the digestive system, or other topics one learns in high school science classes.
The coding aspects of computer science – learning the syntax of a specific programming language such as C++, Java, or Python – the syntactical expertise in one language is least likely to stand the true test of time. The programming language you learn in high school is unlikely to be popular 10 years later, and it’s hard to argue that everystudent must be required to learn any single language. However, teaching a coding language is often necessary for teaching computational thinking or algorithm design, and so it’s a key part of most C.S. education.
The U.S. education system is rapidly changing to broaden access to C.S., and even to require it in many regions.
In many U.S. states (e.g. Arkansas, Virginia, Indiana), computational thinking and digital literacy have already been integrated into the mandatory standards of learning for K-8 students. In these states, the most important foundational aspects of this field will be taught to every student before they even enter high school. When students receive that background in primary school, they can decide for themselves whether they want to take a deeper programming course in high school.
At Code.org, we don’t advocate for making computer science mandatory in high school. We advocate for integrating aspects of it in primary school (grades K-8). But we also support the ambitious school districts (such as Chicago, and Oakland) that have already decided to make it a mandatory high school course.